Episode 5: Facepalm Trademarks

Episode 5: The Trademarks Strike Back. Its Friday and once again time to focus on some of those way too familiar, corny or just out there trademarks of the week. You can be slightly amused by previous episodes of the Facepalm Trademarks here.
Every Tuesday, the United States Patent and Trademark Office releases the Trademark Official Gazette, which publishes trademark registration applications for opposition. This provides trademark owners the opportunity to review any pending applications and oppose if they feel it is confusingly similar to their own mark or for if they have any other reason why they object to the trademark being registered.
This week, 11,702 marks were published for opposition and here we highlight our Facepalm Trademarks applications. Remember the images below are the actual specimens that were submitted in support of the applications to be registered as trademarks. The official Facepalm scale is as follows:

                                              1 Facepalm – Okay, that’s kinda catchy but borderline corny.

                                              2 Facepalms – Really? Whatever.

                                              3 Facepalms – Oh come on, you have got to be kidding!



A door knob?? This mark was registered way back in 1995 by a company named Spectrum and this publication is for a renewal of the rights. Looks like every other door knob but it must just be me because the Trademark Office says this mark if distinctive enough to be afforded trademark protection.  Facepalm Score:



Rorschach test time. What do you see when you see the above pending registration? I saw a ink spill. Apparently, it is a bear, as this mark was registered for jewelry by a company called The Golden Bear, Inc. (The company doesn’t appear to be affiliated with golfer Jack “Golden Bear” Nicklaus.) From pictures on the company’s website, the image looks more like a bear in gold but in black, I’m sticking with ink spill. Facepalm Score:


Sometimes trademarks don’t need to be so abstract (see the Golden Bear) and instead are very very literal. This mark was applied for by, not surprisingly, a job placement company for use in a class covering temporary and permanent employee placement services.  I bet there are a lot of other placement companies steaming about now that they didn’t think to register this mark first. Facepalm Score:



No, that’s the new Batman logo or even the Bacardi Rum logo.  I immediately thought it was for one of the two but it is actually for sewage treatment and disposal plants. Beware the Dark Knight of sewage. Facepalm Score:


I’m taking my trademarked sass off for the weekend. Have a good one!
Fp